Leek and mushroom risotto

risottoThe Italian dish Risotto is a real favourite in our house. I’m not going to pretend that Risotto is quick to cook, some packet mixes can be put together in about 20 minutes, but the real thing takes more like an hour. However, the result is ample reward for a little patience. This recipe uses leek and mushroom, but once you’ve got the hang of it you can use all manner of combinations. Roasted squash is particularly tasty.

Risotto is prepared using Arborio rice. This is essential because, unlike long grain or basmati rice, Arborio has a very high starch content and it’s the starch that gives Risotto it’s wonderful creamy texture.

I make Risotto with a ratio of rice to cooking liquid (stock) of 1:4. So, per person I measure out 100ml of rice (note this is by volume rather than weight) which will require 400ml of stock. This means that for 4 people you will need 1.6 litres of stock which sounds far too much, but Arborio rice absorbs a huge amount of liquid while cooking. Because of this you need to ensure you use a large enough pan, preferably with a thick base to aid even heat distribution as you don’t want hotspots where your rice will stick and burn.

One particular ingredient that I’ve found to have a huge impact on flavour is a good slug of wine, and for risotto I’ve found white is best. As an aside, we tend to use fortified wine for cooking as it keeps well and doesn’t have to be finished off once its open. We are currently using Japanese rice wine, Sake, because we happened to have a bottle, tried it and it worked. Sake is not widely available, so when the bottles empty it’s likely to get replaced with Vermouth.

Risotto is cooked by adding the cooking stock gradually, waiting for each quantity to be absorbed by the rice before adding the next. This is what takes the time, and why the optional beer is on the ingredients list. If you don’t work out what to do with it then you won’t be needing it.

You can make this with just fresh mushrooms (in which case add a couple more), but the dried mushrooms add a real depth of flavour. A 50g packet of dried porcini mushrooms costs up to £3 but you don’t need many and they last for ages when stored in a sealed bag or container.

Ingredients (serves 2)
1 leek
1 tbps olive oil (or 15g butter and 1tps olive oil)
50ml white wine
200ml Arborio rice
800ml vegetable stock
A few dried mushrooms (around 7g in weight)
330ml bottle of beer (optional)
4 large mushrooms (we use chestnut mushrooms)
Salt & pepper
Parmesan cheese or similar (optional)
Rocket (optional)

Method
1. Top and tail the leek (remove the hard tip and tougher leaves from the other end) then slice thinly and rinse well as leek often accumulates grit between the leaves.
2. Pour the oil or oil and butter into a large non-stick frying pan, place on a medium heat then saute the leeks until soft but not browned.
3. If you are using stock cubes, then make up with boiling water and leave in a jug or a pan. If you are using fresh stock this needs to be brought to a boil before taking it off the heat.
4. Add the dried mushrooms to the stock to re-hydrate. This will also transfer some of their flavour to the liquid.
5. Roughly chop the fresh mushrooms and set aside.
6. Add the rice to the pan and stir into the leeks. Increase the heat slightly, then after around 30 seconds add the wine and stir into the rice. The liquid should bubble off quickly, but don’t worry about this as it’s the flavour we’re after. Turn the heat back down to a low simmer.
7. Add the stock to the pan around 50ml at a time and stir in (leave the dried mushrooms in the stock for as long as possible). The rice will gradually absorb the liquid and start to swell.
8. Once each quantity of stock has been absorbed add the next 50ml, and so on. This process will take around 30-40 minutes so be patient.
9. Once you’ve used 3/4 of the stock add the fresh and dried mushrooms to the pan and stir in. The dried mushrooms should be quite soft by now.
10. From now on test the consistency of the rice before adding more stock in case it is cooked. The texture should be ‘Al dente’, which means it will be soft but have a little ‘bite’ to it.
11. When the rice is cooked, season with salt and pepper to taste
12. Serve with shavings of Parmesan cheese and rocket leaves.

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