Courgette stuffed with camargue rice

stuffed courgetteLast night’s dinner was something of an experiment that turned out surprisingly well. I was using a new ingredient, Camargue rice, which I’ve never tried before but had caught my eye in a wholefood shop earlier in the day. Camargue rice is a reddish coloured grain with a firm, nutty texture similar to wild rice. I liked the idea of the texture and also the interest the colour would bring (I’m not normally that poncy about the look of a dish) so I thought I would give it a try.

Most recipes I can find that use Camargue rice are for rice salads, where I guess it’s robust texture and flavour holds well when served cold. But we had a couple of large courgettes that I wanted to use, and fancied stuffing them with something a little different.

We had some leeks in the fridge to use, and food writer Nigel Slater suggests that courgette and Parmesan cheese (or in our case Grana Padan0) go together well. So we had our main ingredients – all that was needed was to figure out how to put them together.

Hollowing out raw courgettes in order to stuff them takes some care and some patience. I use a round-ended sharp knife so that I’m less likely to puncture the skin if I go too far. Start by cutting the courgette in half lengthways. Then run the knife round the edge of the inside of each half. Don’t cut too close to the skin as you’ll run the risk of going through it (although it’s not the end of the world if you do) and too thinner shell will lose all shape. Holding the knife at a diagonal towards the base of the courgette will enable you to get as close to the bottom as possible. Continuing to work on the ‘inside’ of the courgette, make several cuts across the surface at a diagonal to the edge, then turn and make another set of cuts to make a set of small diamond shapes in the exposed flesh. Now you should be able to scoop the seeds and flesh out with a spoon taking care not to split it. Continue to use a knife if you need to. You should end up with a hollowed out ‘boat’ shape and some roughly broken up courgette flesh that can be combined with the other stuffing ingredients.

Ingredients
100ml Camargue rice
200ml cold vegetable stock (if using a cube, just use half. Don’t worry if it doesn’t dissolve straight way, it will as the rice cooks)
2 large courgettes
1½ tbsp olive oil
1 leek
1 clove of garlic
1/2 tsp mace
1 tsp sugar
2 tbsp finely grated Parmesan cheese (or Grana Padano, as we used)
salt & pepper to taste

Method
1. Rinse the rice thoroughly then tip into a smallish pan with the vegetable stock. Bring to the boil then simmer with the lid on for around 30-35 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed by the rice and it’s ‘al dente’ (has a slight ‘bite’ to it). Stir occasionally so it doesn’t stick to the base of the pan, and add a little more water if it needs it before being cooked.
2. Preheat the oven to 190c (Gas mark 5).
3. Halve and hollow out the courgettes, chopping the flesh finely then setting aside.
4. Place the courgettes into a foil-lined oven-proof dish face-down. Drizzle with 1 tbsp of the olive oil then bake for around 15 minutes or until the courgette skins have softened. I find that using a dish where the skins snugly fit the width helps them to hold their shape.
5. Top and tail then slice the leek finely and rinse well to remove any grit that may be lurking between the layers.
6. Pour the remaining olive oil into a large frying pan and bring to a medium heat. Add the courgette flesh, chopped leek, crushed garlic and mace to the pan and cook gently for around 10-15 minutes. The goal is to cook off the water in the courgette flesh and leek so it’s soft but not browned.
7. Drain any remaining fluid from the rice and stir it into the pan with the courgette flesh and leek then remove from the heat.Stir in the grated Parmesan and season with salt and pepper to taste. The amount of cheese is approximate – so you can adjust it to taste.
8. When the courgette skins are done turn them over hollow-side up, keeping them on the foil, and divide the courgette, leek, rice and cheese mix evenly between them. Don’t worry if there’s a bit too much and it spills over, this isn’t Masterchef!
9. Sprinkle with some more grated cheese then put the stuffed courgette skins back into the oven for another 15 minutes until the edge of the skins are beginning to colour. We prefer ours to have a bit of ‘crunch’ – bake for longer if you want a softer result.

Advertisements

Leek and mushroom risotto

risottoThe Italian dish Risotto is a real favourite in our house. I’m not going to pretend that Risotto is quick to cook, some packet mixes can be put together in about 20 minutes, but the real thing takes more like an hour. However, the result is ample reward for a little patience. This recipe uses leek and mushroom, but once you’ve got the hang of it you can use all manner of combinations. Roasted squash is particularly tasty.

Risotto is prepared using Arborio rice. This is essential because, unlike long grain or basmati rice, Arborio has a very high starch content and it’s the starch that gives Risotto it’s wonderful creamy texture.

I make Risotto with a ratio of rice to cooking liquid (stock) of 1:4. So, per person I measure out 100ml of rice (note this is by volume rather than weight) which will require 400ml of stock. This means that for 4 people you will need 1.6 litres of stock which sounds far too much, but Arborio rice absorbs a huge amount of liquid while cooking. Because of this you need to ensure you use a large enough pan, preferably with a thick base to aid even heat distribution as you don’t want hotspots where your rice will stick and burn.

One particular ingredient that I’ve found to have a huge impact on flavour is a good slug of wine, and for risotto I’ve found white is best. As an aside, we tend to use fortified wine for cooking as it keeps well and doesn’t have to be finished off once its open. We are currently using Japanese rice wine, Sake, because we happened to have a bottle, tried it and it worked. Sake is not widely available, so when the bottles empty it’s likely to get replaced with Vermouth.

Risotto is cooked by adding the cooking stock gradually, waiting for each quantity to be absorbed by the rice before adding the next. This is what takes the time, and why the optional beer is on the ingredients list. If you don’t work out what to do with it then you won’t be needing it.

You can make this with just fresh mushrooms (in which case add a couple more), but the dried mushrooms add a real depth of flavour. A 50g packet of dried porcini mushrooms costs up to £3 but you don’t need many and they last for ages when stored in a sealed bag or container.

Ingredients (serves 2)
1 leek
1 tbps olive oil (or 15g butter and 1tps olive oil)
50ml white wine
200ml Arborio rice
800ml vegetable stock
A few dried mushrooms (around 7g in weight)
330ml bottle of beer (optional)
4 large mushrooms (we use chestnut mushrooms)
Salt & pepper
Parmesan cheese or similar (optional)
Rocket (optional)

Method
1. Top and tail the leek (remove the hard tip and tougher leaves from the other end) then slice thinly and rinse well as leek often accumulates grit between the leaves.
2. Pour the oil or oil and butter into a large non-stick frying pan, place on a medium heat then saute the leeks until soft but not browned.
3. If you are using stock cubes, then make up with boiling water and leave in a jug or a pan. If you are using fresh stock this needs to be brought to a boil before taking it off the heat.
4. Add the dried mushrooms to the stock to re-hydrate. This will also transfer some of their flavour to the liquid.
5. Roughly chop the fresh mushrooms and set aside.
6. Add the rice to the pan and stir into the leeks. Increase the heat slightly, then after around 30 seconds add the wine and stir into the rice. The liquid should bubble off quickly, but don’t worry about this as it’s the flavour we’re after. Turn the heat back down to a low simmer.
7. Add the stock to the pan around 50ml at a time and stir in (leave the dried mushrooms in the stock for as long as possible). The rice will gradually absorb the liquid and start to swell.
8. Once each quantity of stock has been absorbed add the next 50ml, and so on. This process will take around 30-40 minutes so be patient.
9. Once you’ve used 3/4 of the stock add the fresh and dried mushrooms to the pan and stir in. The dried mushrooms should be quite soft by now.
10. From now on test the consistency of the rice before adding more stock in case it is cooked. The texture should be ‘Al dente’, which means it will be soft but have a little ‘bite’ to it.
11. When the rice is cooked, season with salt and pepper to taste
12. Serve with shavings of Parmesan cheese and rocket leaves.

The English Hobbit Abroad

More specifically South Korea

yestolifeblog

health, inclusion, human potential

Vegetarian Dad

A blog on the joys of vegetarian parenting

COOKING ON A BOOTSTRAP

by Jack Monroe, bestselling author of 'A Girl Called Jack'

Rocking In The Freelance World

One woman's adventures in self-employment

Anthony McKernan

Thought Shifting Vblogs in 120 seconds.

Penny Veg

plant-based wholefoods on a budget

frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog

n. frugality; the quality of being economical with money or food.

Sheep

Promoting the book