Kale, how did I miss you?

Kale with Pasta Chilli and GarlicThere are some ingredients that I genuinely get excited about cooking and eating. When I considered the packet of kale I had bought earlier on Friday and pondered how I might prepare it I was clear that this was not one of them.

My introduction to kale as a child was not a good one. In fact, you could liken it to a head-on collision as an appetiser to the thrills of car travel. It was not at home (my Mum bears no blame whatsoever) and to this day I’m not quite sure what had taken place between the point it left the greengrocers and when it arrived on my plate. What I can be sure of is that I did not enjoy the result.

You may well be asking why on earth did I go and buy some now? I was asking myself much the same question right up to the point we sat down to eat. But, what I tasted was nothing like my memories of childhood. The bitter taste was replaced by something quite sweet, the khaki hue replaced with vibrant green. How on earth had I spent the last 25 years missing one of the very best vegetables I’ve ever tasted?

Whatever the reason, the fact remains that kale and I have some catching up to do, and the combining it with pasta and some spice is a really quick and easy way to do it. This recipe for kale with pasta, garlic and chilli is incredibly versatile and can be adjusted to taste and whatever you have to hand. We used penne, but I reckon it would work just as well with tagliatelle or even gnocchi. Adding the kale to the pasta water for the last couple of minutes of cooking saves on washing up, but we will probably steam it above, or in a separate pan next time we cook the dish as it preserves the nutrients better.

Ingredients (serves 4)
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 medium onion finely sliced
300g dried penne pasta
200g kale, shredded and rinsed
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 tsp chilli flakes
Parmesan cheese and black pepper to serve

Method
1. Heat the oil in a large frying pan and fry the onion on a low heat until it’s soft and translucent. Then add the garlic and chilli flakes and cook for a while longer so the onion starts to caramelise.
2. Meanwhile cook the pasta according to the instructions on the packet. Either add the kale for the last couple of minutes (we liked it with some bite but you could give it longer) or steam it for 3-4 mins.
3. When the pasta and kale have finished cooking, take the pan with the onions off the heat then stir in the pasta and kale to spread the flavours evenly. Season to taste if it needs it.
4. Sprinkle generously with parmesan cheese (or an equivalent) and black pepper to serve.

Courgette stuffed with camargue rice

stuffed courgetteLast night’s dinner was something of an experiment that turned out surprisingly well. I was using a new ingredient, Camargue rice, which I’ve never tried before but had caught my eye in a wholefood shop earlier in the day. Camargue rice is a reddish coloured grain with a firm, nutty texture similar to wild rice. I liked the idea of the texture and also the interest the colour would bring (I’m not normally that poncy about the look of a dish) so I thought I would give it a try.

Most recipes I can find that use Camargue rice are for rice salads, where I guess it’s robust texture and flavour holds well when served cold. But we had a couple of large courgettes that I wanted to use, and fancied stuffing them with something a little different.

We had some leeks in the fridge to use, and food writer Nigel Slater suggests that courgette and Parmesan cheese (or in our case Grana Padan0) go together well. So we had our main ingredients – all that was needed was to figure out how to put them together.

Hollowing out raw courgettes in order to stuff them takes some care and some patience. I use a round-ended sharp knife so that I’m less likely to puncture the skin if I go too far. Start by cutting the courgette in half lengthways. Then run the knife round the edge of the inside of each half. Don’t cut too close to the skin as you’ll run the risk of going through it (although it’s not the end of the world if you do) and too thinner shell will lose all shape. Holding the knife at a diagonal towards the base of the courgette will enable you to get as close to the bottom as possible. Continuing to work on the ‘inside’ of the courgette, make several cuts across the surface at a diagonal to the edge, then turn and make another set of cuts to make a set of small diamond shapes in the exposed flesh. Now you should be able to scoop the seeds and flesh out with a spoon taking care not to split it. Continue to use a knife if you need to. You should end up with a hollowed out ‘boat’ shape and some roughly broken up courgette flesh that can be combined with the other stuffing ingredients.

Ingredients
100ml Camargue rice
200ml cold vegetable stock (if using a cube, just use half. Don’t worry if it doesn’t dissolve straight way, it will as the rice cooks)
2 large courgettes
1½ tbsp olive oil
1 leek
1 clove of garlic
1/2 tsp mace
1 tsp sugar
2 tbsp finely grated Parmesan cheese (or Grana Padano, as we used)
salt & pepper to taste

Method
1. Rinse the rice thoroughly then tip into a smallish pan with the vegetable stock. Bring to the boil then simmer with the lid on for around 30-35 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed by the rice and it’s ‘al dente’ (has a slight ‘bite’ to it). Stir occasionally so it doesn’t stick to the base of the pan, and add a little more water if it needs it before being cooked.
2. Preheat the oven to 190c (Gas mark 5).
3. Halve and hollow out the courgettes, chopping the flesh finely then setting aside.
4. Place the courgettes into a foil-lined oven-proof dish face-down. Drizzle with 1 tbsp of the olive oil then bake for around 15 minutes or until the courgette skins have softened. I find that using a dish where the skins snugly fit the width helps them to hold their shape.
5. Top and tail then slice the leek finely and rinse well to remove any grit that may be lurking between the layers.
6. Pour the remaining olive oil into a large frying pan and bring to a medium heat. Add the courgette flesh, chopped leek, crushed garlic and mace to the pan and cook gently for around 10-15 minutes. The goal is to cook off the water in the courgette flesh and leek so it’s soft but not browned.
7. Drain any remaining fluid from the rice and stir it into the pan with the courgette flesh and leek then remove from the heat.Stir in the grated Parmesan and season with salt and pepper to taste. The amount of cheese is approximate – so you can adjust it to taste.
8. When the courgette skins are done turn them over hollow-side up, keeping them on the foil, and divide the courgette, leek, rice and cheese mix evenly between them. Don’t worry if there’s a bit too much and it spills over, this isn’t Masterchef!
9. Sprinkle with some more grated cheese then put the stuffed courgette skins back into the oven for another 15 minutes until the edge of the skins are beginning to colour. We prefer ours to have a bit of ‘crunch’ – bake for longer if you want a softer result.

Very lazy evening – jazzing up a supermarket margherita

You’ve probably guessed that if you’re looking for gourmet cuisine you’re unlikely to find it here. This was the product of a late night in the office and the poor choice of  vegetarian options. I just didn’t  want to cook and couldn’t afford a take-away, but still wanted to be a bit creative.

supermarket pizzaSo I bought a couple of margherita pizzas and a jar of cheap green pesto (yes, I could of made it but I really couldn’t be bothered). I had some cherry tomatoes and a red onion so I halved thee tomatoes and chopped then onion finely. To ‘assemble’ the dish I spooned a few dollops of pesto over the pizza then scattered the onion and tomato across the top. I then lightly drizzled some extra virgin olive oil onto it and bunged it in a preheated oven using the time and temperature from the packet.

The result was that the basic cheese and tomato pizza was a whole load more interesting and packed with flavour – definitely worth the few pennies more it cost and the extra five minutes or so it took to prepare.

 

Leek and mushroom risotto

risottoThe Italian dish Risotto is a real favourite in our house. I’m not going to pretend that Risotto is quick to cook, some packet mixes can be put together in about 20 minutes, but the real thing takes more like an hour. However, the result is ample reward for a little patience. This recipe uses leek and mushroom, but once you’ve got the hang of it you can use all manner of combinations. Roasted squash is particularly tasty.

Risotto is prepared using Arborio rice. This is essential because, unlike long grain or basmati rice, Arborio has a very high starch content and it’s the starch that gives Risotto it’s wonderful creamy texture.

I make Risotto with a ratio of rice to cooking liquid (stock) of 1:4. So, per person I measure out 100ml of rice (note this is by volume rather than weight) which will require 400ml of stock. This means that for 4 people you will need 1.6 litres of stock which sounds far too much, but Arborio rice absorbs a huge amount of liquid while cooking. Because of this you need to ensure you use a large enough pan, preferably with a thick base to aid even heat distribution as you don’t want hotspots where your rice will stick and burn.

One particular ingredient that I’ve found to have a huge impact on flavour is a good slug of wine, and for risotto I’ve found white is best. As an aside, we tend to use fortified wine for cooking as it keeps well and doesn’t have to be finished off once its open. We are currently using Japanese rice wine, Sake, because we happened to have a bottle, tried it and it worked. Sake is not widely available, so when the bottles empty it’s likely to get replaced with Vermouth.

Risotto is cooked by adding the cooking stock gradually, waiting for each quantity to be absorbed by the rice before adding the next. This is what takes the time, and why the optional beer is on the ingredients list. If you don’t work out what to do with it then you won’t be needing it.

You can make this with just fresh mushrooms (in which case add a couple more), but the dried mushrooms add a real depth of flavour. A 50g packet of dried porcini mushrooms costs up to £3 but you don’t need many and they last for ages when stored in a sealed bag or container.

Ingredients (serves 2)
1 leek
1 tbps olive oil (or 15g butter and 1tps olive oil)
50ml white wine
200ml Arborio rice
800ml vegetable stock
A few dried mushrooms (around 7g in weight)
330ml bottle of beer (optional)
4 large mushrooms (we use chestnut mushrooms)
Salt & pepper
Parmesan cheese or similar (optional)
Rocket (optional)

Method
1. Top and tail the leek (remove the hard tip and tougher leaves from the other end) then slice thinly and rinse well as leek often accumulates grit between the leaves.
2. Pour the oil or oil and butter into a large non-stick frying pan, place on a medium heat then saute the leeks until soft but not browned.
3. If you are using stock cubes, then make up with boiling water and leave in a jug or a pan. If you are using fresh stock this needs to be brought to a boil before taking it off the heat.
4. Add the dried mushrooms to the stock to re-hydrate. This will also transfer some of their flavour to the liquid.
5. Roughly chop the fresh mushrooms and set aside.
6. Add the rice to the pan and stir into the leeks. Increase the heat slightly, then after around 30 seconds add the wine and stir into the rice. The liquid should bubble off quickly, but don’t worry about this as it’s the flavour we’re after. Turn the heat back down to a low simmer.
7. Add the stock to the pan around 50ml at a time and stir in (leave the dried mushrooms in the stock for as long as possible). The rice will gradually absorb the liquid and start to swell.
8. Once each quantity of stock has been absorbed add the next 50ml, and so on. This process will take around 30-40 minutes so be patient.
9. Once you’ve used 3/4 of the stock add the fresh and dried mushrooms to the pan and stir in. The dried mushrooms should be quite soft by now.
10. From now on test the consistency of the rice before adding more stock in case it is cooked. The texture should be ‘Al dente’, which means it will be soft but have a little ‘bite’ to it.
11. When the rice is cooked, season with salt and pepper to taste
12. Serve with shavings of Parmesan cheese and rocket leaves.

Smoky Bean Soup

I wanted to try some more recipes with beans and, not having too much time to develop my own, I decided to take a look online to find some inspiration. There are so many people blogging about food that it’s more of a problem choosing from the thousands of results you get rather than finding something.

The whole point of this blog is to share our experience and ideas we have tried, not to come up with ‘original’ recipes (except when we try something and it works). So, as a rule, we’ll only share someone elses recipe once we’ve actually tried it and for the recipe itself we’ll link to their site. As with this recipe, where we’ve adjusted ingredients or quantities we’ll include them too.

Smokey Bean SoupWe made Smoky Refried Bean Soup for lunch today, but with a few extras it could easily form the basis of a filling meal. It’s from an American blog called Fatfree Vegan Kitchen, and the author has compiled a whole library of really interesting vegan recipes. Being American, the measurements are based around cup measurements and ounces. A number of the recipes we use are from America and Australia so I’m going to include some conversions on this blog to help you adjust. We do have some cup measures though, which are really useful. 1 cup is approx 250ml if you don’t have a measure to hand.

Adjustments we made
Refried beans – the refried beans mentioned in the recipe are expensive if you buy them ready made. Fortunately you can replace these with a large can of Pinto beans blitzed in a food processor and this works just fine, we bought 2 small cans in Asda and used them both.
Black beans – we used a packet of ready-cooked beans from Sainsburys. If you use dried you need to make sure they are cooked first.
Chopped tomatoes – We used a large can of plum tomatoes and pulsed them in the food processor (it was already out – I felt lazy).
Chipotle powder – Chipotle chillis are jalapenos that have been smoked. I’ve not managed to find powder over here, so I used 1tsp standaard chilli powder then upped the Smoked Paprika to 2tsp.
Smoked Paprika – this is important as it really gives the dish it’s flavour so standard Paprika won’t cut it. You can buy smoked paprika in Asda or Sainsburys.
Hot Sauce – we didn’t want our soup too hot so we skipped this
Mexican oregano – we just used some dried mixed herbs

p.s. Don’t be put off by the photo here – this tastes so much better than it looks!!

 

 

 

 

Houmous

Saturday lunchtime is a simple affair in our house, it usually consists of fresh bread with soup, or whatever we have around. Houmous is a regular feature, and it’s dead easy to make.  This recipe will give you around double the amount you buy in the supermarket and keeps for a few days in the fridge.

Tahini (sesame seed paste) is available in most supermarkets. Make sure you give it a good stir before using as the oil base tends to separate when stored.

Houmous

Ingredients
1 Tin of Chickpeas (400g)
75ml Tahini
2 Cloves of Garlic, peeled
Juice of half a lemon
1 tsp Ground Cumin
Small pinch of Salt
4 Tbsp water

Method
1. Drain the Chickpeas and rinse thoroughly to remove the salt from the water in the tin
2. Tip them, together with the rest of the ingredients, into a blender or food processor then blend to a paste.
3. You can adjust the flavour after tasting if you want to.
4. Serve as a dip with warm fresh bread or pitta bread

Serving
You can serve with a sprinkling of fresh paprika (as shown in the picture), drizzled with some chilli oil or some fresh coriander leaves.

Poached egg muffins

Poached eggs on muffinsSo this is our ‘traditional’ Sunday morning breakfast, think of it as a poor man’s Eggs Benedict.

You will need one English muffin, two cheese slices (we use the processed slices you can buy for burgers – because they melt well and go all gooey) and two eggs per person.

A note on the eggs, we buy free range out of conscience and because they genuinely taste better. Lidl sell a box of six for a pound, far cheaper than the other supermarkets – I think Aldi do too. But whatever you use if you’re poaching eggs they really must be fresh.

Confession time – we cheat with the poached eggs. Having had mixed success poaching one egg, let alone four at once, we have resorted to a gadget. We use silicon moulds that float in the pan called ‘Poachpods’, they are available from Sainsburys, Lakeland or Amazon and cost around a fiver a pair and are nearly foolproof – just remember to coat the inside with a little olive oil first then run a sharp knife round the edge when they’re done. A large egg takes roughly four minutes on a highish simmer if you like your yolk nice and runny.

Given my admission of failure I cannot, with any integrity advise you how to poach an egg ‘properly’, but there are plenty of others who fortunately can. Here’s one that’s guaranteed to be Jamie Oliver free http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2010/sep/16/how-make-perfect-poached-egg.

So to serve, lightly toast each half of the muffin, add a slice of cheese on each while it’s still warm then top them with your poached eggs. A sprinkle of black pepper and dash of HP sauce on the side completes the dish!

Red Lentil Dal

I’m going to start with one of my favourite dishes to cook and to eat.  It’s based on a recipe from Madhur Jaffrey, which is delicious in it’s own right, but with a couple of optional adjustments that I think really lift it.

Red lentils are one of the smallest and most widely available lentils you can buy. Unlike other varieties you can use them without soaking overnight which means that you won’t need to plan too far ahead. You can make two meals from a 500g packet, making it really cheap to make too.

The recipe is straightforward and takes just under an hour to cook, but you can do other things. I often make a large quantity and freeze portions for another meal, a source of envy in the staff room at work! Serve with an Indian flatbread like Roti or Chapati – or lightly toasted pitta bread will do just fine.

Ingredients:

8floz/225ml measure red lentils
1/2 tsp ground turmeric
1 tbsp olive oil
1/3 tsp asafoetida (also known as ‘Hing’ – this is optional but adds extra flavour)
1/2 tsp cumin seeds
1/4 tsp kalonji seeds (black onion seeds)
1 tsp sugar
1 tbsp dessicated coconut
1/2 tsp dried chilli flakes ( this gives a medium heat – feel free to add more or less according to your taste)
Half a small onion, thinly sliced
Half a fat clove of garlic, crushed
Handful of fresh coriander leaves

Method:

1. Thoroughly rinse the lentils in cold water. This is best done in a large bowl, using a sieve to catch any lentils that escape as you pour the water out – do it several times until the water runs clear.
2. Drain the lentils and tip into a large pan with a lid. Pour in 24floz/700ml water, then bring to the boil. A white foam will rise to the surface of the water that needs to be skimmed off with a slotted spoon.
3. Stir in the turmeric, reduce the heat to very low and partially cover with a lid slightly ajar. It will take around 40 mins to cook the lentils, after which time they will be soft to eat with a texture similar to porridge. Stir occasionally to ensure they don’t stick.
4. While the lentils are cooking you can make the tarka. Heat the oil in a small pan on a low heat then and add the onion until it is soft. Then add the asafoetida, cumin seeds, chilli flakes, kalonji seeds, sugar, coconut and garlic. Stir in and cook until the onion is well browned.
5. Pour the mixture into the lentils, stir and put a lid on for about ten minutes. This enables the flavours to really mingle.
6. Serve with some fresh coriander on top.

Red lentil dal

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