Smoky Bean Soup

I wanted to try some more recipes with beans and, not having too much time to develop my own, I decided to take a look online to find some inspiration. There are so many people blogging about food that it’s more of a problem choosing from the thousands of results you get rather than finding something.

The whole point of this blog is to share our experience and ideas we have tried, not to come up with ‘original’ recipes (except when we try something and it works). So, as a rule, we’ll only share someone elses recipe once we’ve actually tried it and for the recipe itself we’ll link to their site. As with this recipe, where we’ve adjusted ingredients or quantities we’ll include them too.

Smokey Bean SoupWe made Smoky Refried Bean Soup for lunch today, but with a few extras it could easily form the basis of a filling meal. It’s from an American blog called Fatfree Vegan Kitchen, and the author has compiled a whole library of really interesting vegan recipes. Being American, the measurements are based around cup measurements and ounces. A number of the recipes we use are from America and Australia so I’m going to include some conversions on this blog to help you adjust. We do have some cup measures though, which are really useful. 1 cup is approx 250ml if you don’t have a measure to hand.

Adjustments we made
Refried beans – the refried beans mentioned in the recipe are expensive if you buy them ready made. Fortunately you can replace these with a large can of Pinto beans blitzed in a food processor and this works just fine, we bought 2 small cans in Asda and used them both.
Black beans – we used a packet of ready-cooked beans from Sainsburys. If you use dried you need to make sure they are cooked first.
Chopped tomatoes – We used a large can of plum tomatoes and pulsed them in the food processor (it was already out – I felt lazy).
Chipotle powder – Chipotle chillis are jalapenos that have been smoked. I’ve not managed to find powder over here, so I used 1tsp standaard chilli powder then upped the Smoked Paprika to 2tsp.
Smoked Paprika – this is important as it really gives the dish it’s flavour so standard Paprika won’t cut it. You can buy smoked paprika in Asda or Sainsburys.
Hot Sauce – we didn’t want our soup too hot so we skipped this
Mexican oregano – we just used some dried mixed herbs

p.s. Don’t be put off by the photo here – this tastes so much better than it looks!!

 

 

 

 

Butternut squash and red pepper soup

Butternut squash and red pepper soupThis soup is a seasonal winter warmer that’s really quick to make. The butternut squash gives it a thick and smooth texture that just leaves you wanting more!

We like it spicy, so we use a fair bit of chilli. However. the quantity shown will give you a mild kick. We use a hand-blender directly into the pan for this recipe. If you’re using a conventional blender it will be safer to let the soup cool a little first, then reheat after blending.

Ingredients (serves 4 generously or 6 as a starter portion)
1 tbps extra virgin olive oil
1 clove garlic, crushed
1½ tsp ground coriander
1 medium to large butternut squash, peeled, seeded and diced
1 red pepper, seeded and chopped
1 pint heated vegetable stock (it’s quite ok to use a cube)
½ tsp cinnamon
½ tsp chilli powder

Method
1. Heat the oil gently in a large heavy-based saucepan
2. Add the crushed garlic and coriander and heat in the oil for a minute
3. Add the squash and peppers and coat in the oil / spice mix then sweat for another 2 minutes
4. Add the vegetable stock, cinnamon and chilli powder then bring to the boil
5. Simmer for around 15-20 minutes, or until the squash is soft
6. Blend to a smooth consistency and serve.
7. We generally serve sprinkled with some chilli flakes, or as in the picture with a drizzle of chilli oil.

Jacket Potatoes

Baked Potato

Image courtesy of lovepotatoes.co.uk

On a cold winters day there is something very satisfying about an oven-baked Jacket Potato, even before it’s smothered in butter and cheese, or any other filling that takes your fancy.

Potatoes are really healthy for you. Not only do they contain healthy levels vitamin C, but they are also a great source of iron, calcium, vitamin B6, and potassium. The skin is a great source of fibre and also contains antioxidants which can help to prevent heart disease and cancer.

When it comes to cooking a jacket potato I can’t really tell you better than the Potato Council, so you can find their recipe at lovepotatoes.co.uk.

Once you have cooked your potato you have a canvas for all manner of deliciousness. A helping of baked beans topped with cheese is a personal favourite, but why stop there?

Leek and potato make a great combination. Finely slice a leek then rinse to get rid of the grit that tends to accumulate between the layers then fry gently in a little olive oil or butter until they are soft and translucent , but not browned. Then spoon into your potato with a little creme fraiche.

Sweetcorn also goes really well. You can use tinned or frozen, just cook it as if you were going to serve it on the side. Spoon into the potato with a little mayonnaise.

If you have a favourite filling, why not share it by adding a comment below?

Houmous

Saturday lunchtime is a simple affair in our house, it usually consists of fresh bread with soup, or whatever we have around. Houmous is a regular feature, and it’s dead easy to make.  This recipe will give you around double the amount you buy in the supermarket and keeps for a few days in the fridge.

Tahini (sesame seed paste) is available in most supermarkets. Make sure you give it a good stir before using as the oil base tends to separate when stored.

Houmous

Ingredients
1 Tin of Chickpeas (400g)
75ml Tahini
2 Cloves of Garlic, peeled
Juice of half a lemon
1 tsp Ground Cumin
Small pinch of Salt
4 Tbsp water

Method
1. Drain the Chickpeas and rinse thoroughly to remove the salt from the water in the tin
2. Tip them, together with the rest of the ingredients, into a blender or food processor then blend to a paste.
3. You can adjust the flavour after tasting if you want to.
4. Serve as a dip with warm fresh bread or pitta bread

Serving
You can serve with a sprinkling of fresh paprika (as shown in the picture), drizzled with some chilli oil or some fresh coriander leaves.

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